Roger

From How Emotions Are Made
Jump to: navigation, search

Chapter 4 endnote 55, from How Emotions are Made: The Secret Life of the Brain by Lisa Feldman Barrett.
Some context is:

Since Roger has working autonomic nervous, endocrine, and immune systems, and much of the subcortical circuitry involved in interoception is still intact (like regions of his brainstem and hypothalamus), he still has sensory inputs coming to his interoceptive cortex from the body, which can be used to compute prediction error.

So, how does Roger experience affect? Roger is missing limbic tissue, meaning the body-budgeting regions in his cerebral cortex can’t send interoceptive predictions to his primary interoceptive cortex. Roger’s primary interoceptive cortex must be creating interoceptive simulations in another way, without his damaged body-budgeting cortical regions. Degeneracy strikes again.

Interoception is a whole brain event, with the interoceptive network playing a primary role, and other networks playing a secondary role. So when the primary players are damaged, the secondary players can step up. In fact, any region in the brain that is connected to primary interoceptive cortex (in the mid-to-posterior insula) will send interoceptive predictions, as long as those regions have relatively fewer layers of neurons. Roger is most likely using predictions from other brain regions, as well (e.g., the cerebellum), to create interoceptive sensations. Also, he has working autonomic nervous system, endocrine system, and immune system, and much of the subcortical circuitry involved in interoception is still intact (like regions of his brainstem and hypothalamus), meaning he still has sensory inputs coming to his interoceptive cortex from the body, which can be used to compute prediction error.